Living in New England, we are used to weather extremes, like snow for example. This winter has been one for the record books in our neck of the woods, which was evident by our most recent snowpocalypse, which left in its wake over 2 feet of snow in many locales. Many folks became stranded as the snow hammered down on our region, often times dumping 3-4 inches per hour! Working overnights outside of Litchfield county, and on Connecticut’s shoreline, I was one of the many that became stranded due to the storm, though I knew beforehand that I probably wasn’t going to make it back home come Wednesday morning.

At first, I was hesitant about booking a room for the day. After all, this is New England. We can handle anything, right? Wrong! As I kept an eye on the storm through the work night, I noticed that this storm wasn’t letting up anytime soon, in fact, it was getting more intense by the hour. This monster, or for better terms “snowpocalypse”, was something more than we are used to here in New England as it continued to hammer our region at full force. By my 2AM lunch hour, the storm had already left a good 5 inches on the ground as the winds picked up in intensity.

I decided that this seemed like the perfect time to head out and take some pictures of what it was like during the height of this storm. After all, many folks are usually sleeping at this hour and are missing out on all the action. I was ready to brave the elements as I layered myself and threw on my ski jacket. I was ready alright. I was ready to be blown away!  The winds were certainly nothing to play around with, which is evident by the video that I shot at the bottom of this column. Not only was it hard to walk, it was hard to stand still as the winds were ready to carry me away. After a few quick shots, it was time to head back inside and see what the radar was displaying as the storm was quickly picking up. Heavier snow bands were just about to move into the area, as they were moving north coming in from Long Island,NY.

The Hampton Inn offered a comfortable stay while being snowbound on Connecticut's shoreline.
By the time 8AM had come around, which is the time I get out of work, conditions were less than favorable as a complete and total whiteout was taking place. It was certainly evident that even if I wanted to venture back up to Litchfield county, I would never make it back home. The best bet was certainly to head right across the street to the Hampton Inn, which was by far the smartest choice I have made in a long time. As an adrenaline junkie who lives for adventure, I like to live life on the edge. There was no time or place, however, to live life on the edge during snowpocalypse. This storm was dangerous as local and state officials urged everyone to stay home and off the roads.

Watching WFSB, I saw that the West Haven area wasn’t as hard hit as the Torrington area was, reporting that Torrington had close to 30 inches of snow! Living in the hills, we are used to snow! In fact, we usually stay snow-covered for the vast majority of winter, which is no surprise given our elevations and forested landscape. With more snow in the forecast for next week, as well as this weekend, one has to wonder where exactly we plan to put all this snow, and just how much more snowpocalypse’s we’ll see this winter. Though as a skier, I’m in heaven. This is my summertime!

Readers have also responded back greatly during this storm. On my Facebook page, as well as my Twitter account, I asked for people to send in some of the pictures that they had of Snowpocalypse 2011. Thank-you everyone who sent in some pretty great shots!

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